Approaching the station

The Façade of Milton Keynes railway station is a hundred yards of glass. A sky reflector, pure and simple. And on a good day what a sight it is. As I walk towards this my spirits lift.

_DS79357Turn ninety degrees anticlockwise and you see another glass fronted building adjoining the station frontage and here the reflections include the building opposite. Reflections reduced to a bizarre stripe of hieroglyphics.

DSC07404_1As I said to someone yesterday: wouldn’t the world be a vastly poorer place if reflections didn’t exist?

Click on either image to see a higher quality enlargement.

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About LensScaper

Hi - I'm a UK-based photographer who started out 45+ years ago as a lover of landscapes, inspired by my love of outdoor pursuits: skiing, walking and climbing. Now retired, I seldom leave home without a camera and I find images in unexpected places and from different genres. I work on the premise that Photography is Art and that creativity is dependent on the cultivation of 'A Seeing Eye'. I'm not averse to manipulating images to produce derivatives that may sometimes be far removed from the original.
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15 Responses to Approaching the station

  1. Chillbrook says:

    It would indeed Andy, these reflections are wonderful and superbly captured! No wonder your spirits lift.

  2. Hi Andy,
    These are both great shots. I prefer the first with the careful composition and positioning of the yellow topped beacons. The strip of hieroglyphics in the second shot are nicely observed. Will we be treated to a close up shot/crop of just a few panels? It might make an interesting abstract. You’ve got into your stride early in 2015! Best wishes for a happy, healthy and creative new year. Mr Cafe 🙂

  3. poppytump says:

    Great abstract qualities in here Andy . Imagine unravelling the meaning of those ‘hieroglyphics’ 😉

  4. oneowner says:

    Reflections like these are very interesting, especially to photographers who know how to isolate them as well as you.

  5. In the first photograph, the roundness of those two globes makes quite a contrast with the linearity that dominates the rest of the picture, and there’s a contrast in colors as well.

    • LensScaper says:

      Thanks Steve. The first image would be my favourite too. The second one was taken five years ago. Given the right conditions I’m sure I can improve on it.

  6. This is such an amazing sight! I would love to see the reflections during a storm. ..

  7. shoreacres says:

    I do prefer the liveliness of the first photo. It’s interesting, how both the clouds and the lamps imply diagonal lines that cross.

    On the other hand, “hieroglyphics” seems perfect for that second photo, or perhaps pictographs. There are at least a couple of patterns that are repeated, with slight variations. It’s a great photo to sit and explore.

    • LensScaper says:

      Thank you Linda. I must re-visit and shoot the second scene again when the light is right and use a longer lens to concentrate on the ‘hieroglyph’ part of the facade.

  8. Len says:

    Reflections are certainly a photographer magnet Andy. I love that first image. It has has a great pattern and those clouds are magnificent.

  9. Jimi Jones says:

    Be they in water, glass or a piece of shiny metal, reflections are very fascinating things. You created some great abstracts in the glass with the way you’ve shot them, Andy. Very nice.

  10. Julie says:

    beautiful reflection themed pictures!
    I absolutely agree, this world would be a poorer place if reflections wouldn’t exist…an who knows, mankind would probably be not the same- after all are reflections in different shapes the only way that enable us to see our own faces….

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