Etched by man, sculpted by nature

Two evenings ago, the sky was just mesmerising as the sun sank low. Contrails, etched across the sky, were lingering longer than usual, blown and spread wide by high altitude winds, intermingling with milky strands of cirrus cloud. This was a spectacle to be captured before it evaporated, and within a few minutes, the heavens were wiped clean by an unseen hand and the magic was gone. How fleeting these images can be.

I took quite a few images, searching for the best viewpoint and the right framing from the field beyond the end of our garden. Should I or shouldn’t I include the horizon? Zooming in on the central unfolding design in the sky was one picture. Using the local horizon as a base was another.

Each tells a different story. But which one works best? Do comment and let me know which you prefer and why?

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About LensScaper

Hi - I'm a UK-based photographer who started out 45+ years ago as a lover of landscapes, inspired by my love of outdoor pursuits: skiing, walking and climbing. Now retired, I seldom leave home without a camera and I find images in unexpected places and from different genres. I work on the premise that Photography is Art and that creativity is dependent on the cultivation of 'A Seeing Eye'. I'm not averse to manipulating images to produce derivatives that may sometimes be far removed from the original.
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22 Responses to Etched by man, sculpted by nature

  1. rigmover says:

    Both are great but top one for me, gives a better sense of scale.

  2. oneowner says:

    I like both shots but I believe that the sky is a subject in it’s own and needs no foreground if it’s interesting enough, which it certainly is here. I like the second photo better.

  3. Maggie Zwilling says:

    I like the horizon line – gives the sky more power!

  4. Dave DiCello says:

    Those are some amazing clouds Andy! What a beautiful sight!

  5. I love capturing clouds. You’ve done a great job of getting these. I like them both, but the first one gives me better perspective.

  6. The first one does it for me Andy, but more to the point you have demonstrated yet again that you have an ‘eye’ for a good image, and that you are ready to grab those fleeting moments – well done!

    • LensScaper says:

      Thanks Paul. I have to thank my wife for spotting this one as she laboured away in the kitchen. Supper was delayed as I exited the garden into the field beyond for five minutes. By the time we had eaten, the sky was bland and unrecognizable. These scenes don’t last long.

  7. I prefer the shot with the horizon to give the image context and scale. The sky still carries the image, but the horizon provides additional visual interest. Nice job, btw.

  8. seekraz says:

    The more I observe what’s going on in this photo-blog community, the more I understand that our photos need something to at least suggest perspective…so I’d vote for the one with the buildings on the horizon…they help define what you have captured as beautiful above it.

  9. Phillip says:

    Great clouds. I like them both, because each image tells a different story. The first image the clouds are just accenting the landscape. In the second they are the total subject.

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